Thursday, May 15, 2008

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New World Newsfeed: Acting As An Attractive Avatar Boost Actual Self-Esteem, Research Suggests

Time_story Recent dispatches from the outside world...

How Second Life Affects Real Life - TIME

Avatars influence real world self-perception-- that's the monumental (if tentative) conclusion reached by Stanford's Jeremy Bailenson and Nick Yee (a Stanford grad now at Palo Alto Research Center) I wrote about at length here.  Time Magazine expands on their work further-- an essential bulletpoint:

Bailenson has found that even 90 seconds spent chatting it up with avatars is enough to elicit behavioral changes offline — at least in the short term. "When we cloak ourselves in avatars, it subtly alters the manner in which we behave," says Bailenson. "It's about self-perception and self-confidence."

As their work continues spreading through the mainstream media, watch as seismic cultural shifts happen. 

Hat tip: Eureka Dejavu, who's notably dazzling in both realities.

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Two Worlds

You're freakin' kidding me.

You know all those naysayers who rant about how Second Life is mostly for neckbearded nerds, anti-socials, and 'spergin shut-ins?

This. This is what they're talking about. Way to perpetuate the stereotype. Second Life isn't a "tool" for improving social skills--not anymore than some otaku Japanese dating simulator will help me talk to girls at nightclubs. It's a crutch, and an enabler.

Second Life has some great potential for dramatic improvements to how we live our lives but please...this isn't it.

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