« Watch Huckleberry Hax's Poetic Tribute to Second Life | Main | Firestorm-Created Mesh Causing Display Problems in SL? »

Monday, June 22, 2015

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Jake K

I'm guessing that when the free google translating service was taken down, it really cut back on people from less prosperous countries being able to participate in Second Life. (pretty much every Arab & Turk I was able to chat with was via the translator service)

zz bottom

Yes that is one of the reasons, another is that there are much worrying issues on most of those countries that for sure deny the use of internet.
Or perhaps they just found out open sim.

muhammad ahmad

Of all the communities it was the most ignored by the owners of the 2ndLife
for years most Arabs were faced with huge discrimination by other residents for not speaking English
People think its simple to learn English when many are in nations that frown on western culture & ideas so when one starts typing or speaking English the censors take notice of you and family that's why they had choose to not learn or speak it on unprotected channels,
yes loss of translation in viewer combined with the newer tighter rules over last 3 years they all look at other things online,
Even owners of 2ndlife wanted us gone so the biggest communities all sent elders for a big meeting to decide with vote to close a winner
[2ndlifes staff was asked to join the meeting but we was told no one was available thru a phone call then a remark was made they did not want to get blown up jokenly by the rep for hanging up]
people can only go so long knowing those around them only see them as savages and who question there very esistance as human beings because of a difference in the language and faith not by the content of there character,
they spent more money while renting more land then any other community the loss was 2ndlifes.

muhammad ahmad


in 12 years can anyone point out any linden showcase of Arab or middle eastern culture..of course not! only thing was destination guide had over 30 of the most popular Arabic Sims in it

Connie Arida

To generalise, I think Second life is very "white bread" with any other cultures usually represented by some american or european idea of that culture. Sl is a monoculture. Discuss.

zz bottom

No it is not.
the only issue with SL is its freedom that makes it dangerous to many cultures that survive upon fear and guilt!

Hand Held

Seems Second Life just got more safe..on a more positive note maybe they all went back to africa were they belong.

A.J.

I don't see SL as a great melting pot. It feels very tribal to me. If a certain tribe started to deplete, I don't think it would take long to become virtually extinct.

SL is only friendly when you are able to plant yourself in a large enough tribe that can support an illusion of a well-rounded social experience.

Karen


I visited several of those Arab Sims a few years back & they were very friendly while the Sims were just gorgeous builds.Sadly the landmarks now lead to empty ocean now.

Rin

The noted decline in Arab-speaking participation and regions in SL does correlate with the various developments we have witnessed happening in the Arab world. And sadly almost all of the autocratic regimes there jumped on any sign of free speech or uncontrollable online service that might allow to spread - for them - dangerous materials and ideas.

I would not be surprised if SL would be hit by this as well and found itself blocked in some countries. And those who spend lots of time in it, are involved and host sims, might found themselves as much of a target for the oppression-forces (I decline to call those people police because it would be an insult to all the proper police people out there) as bloggers or other people who are active online.

I sadly have no data right now on the state of access to SL in those countries or how it might be seen there, but such a dramatic drop in participation as noted in the comment above is rather telling. If this is the real reason cannot be said, but it kind of offers itself as a very likely explanation.

And as far as cultural representation from LLs side goes, they have not put a 'showcase' on any culture as far as I can tell. It is of course the residents who do and create everything and since the biggest communities are from North America and Europe, their ideas are often most prominent. Of course both are not monolithic cultures and cannot be subsumed under one special culture either.

Peggy Sue

Most of the Japanese population is leaving due to linden lab allowing stolen content to be sold on the marketplace with very little chance of penalty.

Look at the Jews & Indians they are mostly gone as well.

Kirsten Corleone

What about Kingdom of Sand- https://www.flickr.com/photos/kirstentacular/14268227947/in/dateposted-public/ I know it is a role play sim but it seemed to be an Arab community. I know when I visited I saw two men talking in open chat with some form of arabic language. It is also an extremely beautiful sim.
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/KoS/247/26/552

Hanna

@@ Kirsten Corleone

Was just recent stories here regarding those sim owners -yes- they have a RPG community that's nice to pretend to be living 1000 years ago.
Also still left and a marvel of both a build is the Sim - Majilis Al Jinn, Sands of Time

Both have something in common they are fantasy sim's with one full time RPG - a community yes but nothing related to the article.

Example 4 years ago i ended up visiting the Arab Four Season sim's for around a month.
it was 18 regions with thousands of real Arab's living in it as a community but not as roleplay

a real life get together for people around the middle east- one day asking how many lived in the Sims and was told 15k people off & on in shared homes
- Shocked & in my travels the number cannot be 50k more like 150k residents lost - paying residents too boot 10,000s of thousands of active residents poof!
- It's worth trying to find out why for the new grid if you ask me.

You make a good point Kirsten that some Arabian inspired Sim's are still left filled with fantasy and adventure-that's kinda like a taco bell store selling tacos in Mexico city.

Frank Rost

I believe localization is the key to international success. Understanding an international customer base, catering to their needs and providing them with support if needed can do miracles to customer relationships.

That said, Linden Lab provides nothing even rudimentary related to that. Second Life is for Americans and Americanophiles. You need to be able to communicate in english or you are doomed. Try solving a support issue without speaking english, try finding help topics without speaking english, try to move within SL without speaking english - you will soon find out that this is a daunting experience and most probably leave.

There used to be quite some lively communities of non-english speaking customers and they used to be supported by Linden Lab. The Lab decided to remove this support with Rand and Noelle Linden just being the last ones to get the boot and since then basically all of those communities have basically vanished.

Shockwave Yareach

I believe they got a double whammy. When the translator disappeared a numbers of my groups members from Germany and Spain dropped out. No doubt some of that is at work. Combined with the chaos in so much of the Middle East and folks there simply need their attention on real goings on.

As for SL being white bread - if you make your area boring, that's your fault. I'm a furry and my private quarters and sandbox are in orbit, stars slowly rotating around it. We have games, dances, movie nights... All in animal costume. You can call it many thing, but "white bread" will never be among them. I've also personally seen zombie shootemup sims and mech warrior sims and once upon a time, bab5 sims. If everything you see is white people in America, you really should explore some more.

Petal Abdool


They left due to western perception of superiority

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Wagner James Au
Wagner James "Hamlet" Au
Dutchie Evergreen Slideshow 29112021
my site ... ... ...

PC/Mac readers recommend for SL:

Classic New World Notes stories:

The Husband That Eshi Made: Metaverse artist, grieving for her dead husband, recreates him as an avatar (2008)

Labor Union Protesters Converge On IBM's Metaverse Campus: Leaders Claim Success, 1850 Total Attendees (Including Giant Banana & Talking Triangle) (2007)

All About My Avatar: The story behind amazing strange avatars (2007)

Fighting the Front: When fascists open an HQ in Second Life, chaos and exploding pigs ensue (2007)

Copying a Controversy: Copyright concerns come to the Metaverse via... the CopyBot! (2006)

The Penguin & the Zookeeper: Just another unlikely friendship formed in The Metaverse (2006)

"—And He Rezzed a Crooked House—": Mathematician makes a tesseract in the Metaverse — watch the videos! (2006)

Guarding Darfur: Virtual super heroes rally to protect a real world activist site (2006)

The Skin You're In: How virtual world avatar options expose real world racism (2006)

Making Love: When virtual sex gets real (2005)

Watching the Detectives: How to honeytrap a cheater in the Metaverse (2005)

The Freeform Identity of Eboni Khan: First-hand account of the Black user experience in virtual worlds (2005)

Man on Man and Woman on Woman: Just another gender-bending avatar love story, with a twist (2005)

The Nine Souls of Wilde Cunningham: A collective of severely disabled people share the same avatar (2004)

Falling for Eddie: Two shy artists divided by an ocean literally create a new life for each other (2004)

War of the Jessie Wall: Battle over virtual borders -- and real war in Iraq (2003)

Home for the Homeless: Creating a virtual mansion despite the most challenging circumstances (2003)

Newstex_Author_Badge-Color 240px