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Wednesday, February 20, 2019

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Gattz Gilman

I'm sure if won't be long until LL enforces a image file dimension check server side, the same they are doing with limiting the number of group tag changes due to scripted RLV devices that animates group tags.

Unfortunately the majority of the SL community does not know how to correctly use textures to make creations that are optimize to minimize "lag".

Beq Janus

Sadly, while the observations here are correct the post is just as full of misinformation as the earlier post that Whirly and I took time to try to correctly explain. It seems that misinformation rules the day.

*You cannot upload high than 1024x1024 - try it yourself*

The lab strictly enforces the resolution of ALL image uploads. This is simple fact. All that is happening in this example is that the source image that you are allowed to specify in the uploader can be larger than the default 2048. It then gets resized to the target dimensions of 1024 BEFORE it is sent to the lab.

The "improvement" attained is not through the increased size but instead through the algorithm being used to do the resizing. It will give enhanced details in certain use cases and more grainy results if you have a smooth texture gradient.

This was explained in detail in my blog http://beqsother.blogspot.com/2019/02/compression-depression-tales-of.html and discussed with other creators in the SL forums https://community.secondlife.com/forums/topic/433164-bi-curious-you-should-be-or-why-your-assumed-wisdom-may-not-be-correct/

TL;DR when resizing your images always pick the best algorithm. In general, to preserve fine detail use the bilinear appraoach, to maintain smooth gradients use bicubic.

Beq

Beq Janus

Actually, the wording of my first comment is a little strong. This post goes a long way to correcting the misinformation, thank you Hamlet.
There is still a misdirection here though, the bottom line is, keep control of textures yourself, use the beta/test grid to verify texture uploads and experiment yourself with the best resizing for your use case. Much as I would love to think that in the viewer we can do a better job than Adobe, it is not the case, we simply do a different job than the Adobe defaults and in some cases that works out better.

These posts and the resultant investigations and conversations have been useful and have led to some interesting subsequent discussion about whether the 2048 limit should be in place, and the answer, from my perspective, is in two parts.
1) The limit itself serves no real purpose. Ultimately the viewer will upload a 1024 so limiting the input size makes no sense....but...
2) As was raised in the past in this blog, one of the problems we face in SecondLife is inefficient content design, and a move that encourages the creation of high resolution (1024) textures as part of a default workflow is going to lead to a worsening of this situation.

To this end I have proposed an amendment to the viewer (and server) that would allow for the simplified creation of multiple resolutions in a single transaction. https://jira.secondlife.com/browse/BUG-226352
Ultimately I would like to see this generate a range of resolutions from a single (high resolution) source image, for a single upload fee. I think the feature has value without the single fee change, but the take up would be far lower.

The hope is that with such a feature, artists and creators can work with high-resolution images and the viewer will produce multiple resolution uploads allowing the creators to test the appearance and make better decisions about when a 1024x1024 image is really needed.

Beq
Firestorm Viewer Dev.

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Wagner James Au
Wagner James "Hamlet" Au
Dutchie Evergreen Slideshow 29112021
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