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Wednesday, December 07, 2022

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bloxorz

Really? Because it is so popular in Tik Tok and almost people play it

Tad Noodle

Artists are upset about AI because the people or companies who make them feed artists work into it without their permission. There are galleries full of AI art with stolen art, styles generated from beloved artists who have passed and artists who are still alive trying to make a living off of their work. As an artist who loves SL, I can see the novelty in it, but it also breaks my heart to see SLers embrace AI art when the "art" is stolen from people I admire. It's funny though, that Lensa is straight up taking the signatures of the artists. Shameless lol. It wouldn't be such a big deal if the artists were paid for their work, which like 90% of non-artists think is asking too much. AI artists have even begun to harass artists for asking them not to use their art for AI, while other programs rip off styles and techniques under the guise of something else. Ai art was fascinating at first. But for a cost. As a meme generator and a springboard for ideas, sure that's pretty cool. But stealing art for progress is hurting our livelihoods in an environment where we are fighting for our lives for our business, visibility on social media websites that hate us, and appreciation for our craft. I'm sure people will disagree with me (no surprise there) but the entitlement is unreal. AI art is stealing from artists, so it's no surprise Lensa is shamelessly generating the signatures too.

Zoe Jimenez

I use Midjourney, which samples artists "without consent," but I would never use it for work to be published if I ever saw it actually cut and paste work from a sampled work. In fact, it is designed to be creative in a way that you CANNOT get it to perfectly replicate an artist's style or work. It learns from the art it sees in the same way I learned to draw by reading tons of comics. I cant speak for other systems, but Midjourney is a system with safeguards built in so it can't steal or copy, and they are continually curating its source marerial and systems to prevent copying and stealing. Even attempting to get pictures of celebrities often morphs them a bit to prevent deep-fakes. The problem is not so much the sampling, which is used to teach it rather than to give it content to copy, but the way in which each company allows it to be used, and also whether an artist using the system ethically. I think that a lot of artists who are upset are not only unfamiliar with how these systems actually WORK, but misdirected at the sampling rather than the user and the programmer. It can be programmed and used ethically, and an artist publishing work should be held accountable if they publish a copy directly no matter whether it is ai or hand-drawn. In the meantime, there is no problem with someone tracing a comic book drawing for personal use, or playing with ai apps for some fun. Personal use and publishing carry very different moral standards. As an artist, I actually tried to get midjourney to reproduce one of my drawings by feeding it my art as a reference and it would NOT do it. If someone publishes a comic book using actual pieces of your work, they are liable whether it is ai or not. Projects like midjourney are just the first steps of a much larger destination of art apps that will use assets and apply a created style, much like CGI games and cartoons use assets and have a computer animate them. An artist angry at AI will want to say, "but-- but!!" Well, my point is, point your finger at a person who actually copies your art, not at the concept of sampling to teach art. We all do it, and we are responsible for what we create and publish. Go after the company that allows people to actually recreate your work. Get in there on the ai system and make a proof of concept for your case by making the ai reproduce a piece of your work. I would not be able to, with Midjourney. Because, Ethics. As for being compansated for your work? If I hire you or use your actual work, sure, but if I study Jack Kirby and then want to draw a comic by hand in his style without actually copying, there's not really a legal case there. Jack Kirby might grumble if here were here, or he might hire me. You might even find that learning to use software like midjourney might help teach people concepts of art, help you brainstorm or bounce ideas off of. Get in there and learn what it is first before getting angry - most people have no idea what this really is.

shak

" it is designed to be creative in a way that you CANNOT get it to perfectly replicate an artist's style or work. It learns from the art it sees in the same way I learned to draw by reading tons of comics." that just simply not true, it is copying the image not copying from the image there is different and it seems you don't really understand how ai works...

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